AWE Fears WaterSense May Lose Funding

The Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) believes that the EPA’s WaterSense labeling program is in grave danger of losing its funding as part of Trump administration EPA budget cuts.

Which is why the AWE recently delivered a letter to EPA Administrator Pruitt to urge continued funding for the labeling program. WaterSense labeling has been proposed for elimination in the White House budget, along with the EPA’s Energy Star program.

The AWE’s letter outlines the numerous benefits of WaterSense. And it represents the support of 187 manufacturers, businesses, water providers, and other organizations.

EPA Administrator Holds Key to Funding

The 10-year-old WaterSense program was designed to help consumers save water by labeling products that use at least 20% less water, while performing as well as or better than standard models.

But the program has never been congressionally authorized and has been funded at the discretion of the EPA Administrator.

“The WaterSense program is a cornerstone of our nation’s water sustainability strategy, and has become vital to American communities, manufacturers, and service providers.”  That’s according to Mary Ann Dickinson, AWE President and CEO.

“Defunding the program will be harmful to US businesses and families.”   Mary Ann Dickinson, AWE President and CEO

She believes the Trump administration’s budget “undervalues the contribution water efficiency makes to economic growth and the benefits of efficiency for US-based manufacturing.” According to Dickinson, “Defunding the program will be harmful to US businesses and families.”

The AWE letter calls on Administrator Pruitt and Congress to maintain the $2 million budget for WaterSense, stating in part that WaterSense is “a voluntary public-private partnership that has saved American consumers more than $33 billion (in 2015 dollars) on their water and energy bills over the past decade.”

The letter goes on to state that “WaterSense has already saved more than 1.5 trillion gallons of water. That’s more than the amount of water used by all of the households in California for a year!”

Click Here to view the complete letter.

Corporate Support

The letter was supported by leading American companies and organizations such as the Irrigation Association, Hunter Industries, Rain Bird Corp, Kohler Company, and more than 183 other organizations, including water providers from around the country.

According to the AWE, the WaterSense program has more than 1,700 partner organizations that rely on the program to support their businesses or water efficiency strategies. The WaterSense standards are also the basis for legislation in four states and other local plumbing codes that reference it. In addition, the program helps consumers manage their water costs and can help American families reduce their water bills by up to $350 per year. 

Others agree that defunding the program is a bad idea. Such as Pete DeMarco, AWE Board Chair and Executive Vice President of Advocacy & Research at the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials. “Eliminating WaterSense would destabilize the marketplace for manufacturers… and irrigation professionals that market their WaterSense certification.” 

As a result, the AWE is working closely with the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials, Plumbing Manufacturers International, American Water Works Association, and the High-Performance Buildings Coalition to preserve the labeling program. They invite all organizations with a stake in water resources to join them in the effort.
 

Want to Get Involved? Here’s How…

The Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) is accepting new members.

The AWE is the only non-profit organization dedicated solely to the sustainable and efficient use of water in North America.

The Alliance is carving a path to a water-efficient and water-secure world, and they invite you to join this group of leading thinkers, decision-makers and pioneers.

To Join the AWE or to Learn More…
Click Here

Sources:

Alliance for Water Efficiency

WaterWorld

2017 Ohio IA Annual Election Results

Leadership
The Ohio Irrigation Association is pleased to announce the election of the following individuals to the Officers and Board of Directors positions for 2017:

Ohio Irrigation Association Officers 2017

 PositionNameCompany PhoneCity/State
JC Wheaton PortraitPresidentJ. C. WheatonCenterville Landscaping(937) 433-5395Centerville, Ohio
Renzo DiFrancoVice PresidentRenzo DeFrancoIrrigation Pro, Inc.(440) 572-6600Columbia Station, Ohio
John Newlin, Secretary, Ohio Irrigation AssociationSecretaryJohn NewlinQuality Sprinkling Systems, Inc.(440) 327-1936North Ridgeville, Ohio
John DolleTreasurerJohn B. DolleRainscapes Irrigation Services(937) 313-6644Springboro, Ohio

Board of Directors 2017

 NameCompany PhoneCity/State
Kevin DarnerKevin DarnerWolf Creek Company(937) 854-2694 Office
(513) 913-0686
(937) 524-1728
Cincinnati, Ohio
Jim JulianoEMI (Environmental Management Inc.(614) 876-9988Columbus, Ohio
Kris KeckleyKris KeckleyRain One Irrigation & Drainage(614) 759-1196Blacklick, Ohio
Mike KneperMike KnepperCentury Equipment(513) 285-1811 office
(513) 889-6779 cell
Cincinnati, Ohio
Tim OwenTim OwenSiteOne Landscape Supply(614) 989-3839
(800) 347-4272 toll-free
Columbus, Ohio
(with locations throughout the U.S.)

Estimating Workshop for Irrigation Contractors February 20, 2017 by JR Huston

Help Wanted – Irrigation Installation Foreman, Columbus (OH) Area

Environmental Management LogoEnvironmental Management, Columbus, Ohio
Experienced Landscape Irrigation Installation Foreman Needed

Help Wanted — Irrigation Installation Foreman needed for installing and maintaining underground irrigation systems for both residential and commercial clients according to EMI standard operating procedures.

Position requires previous irrigation experience and/or electrical experience.  Foreman works in cooperation with Landscape Design/Sales, Landscape Division Operations Manager, with quality and customer satisfaction as top priority.

Communicates and resolves all issues related to installation to ensure the installation meets the specifications of the design and client.  Able to properly maintain and complete daily paperwork needed to report service activities to customers and EMI administration.  Able and willing to communicate with customer when needed.

Position may require working off hours and weekends to service residential clients.  Must be available to work extended hours, weekends and during inclement weather.

The employee must provide leadership and work direction for Irrigation Crew Laborers.  They are responsible for vehicle operation, equipment operation and adherence to EMI established safety procedures.

Salary based on experience, ranging from $17.00 to $25.00 an hour

For more information on available career opportunities, please call EMI Employee Services at 614.876.9988, or visit us at www.landscapepros.com.


About Environmental Management

Environmental Management Inc. is one of the largest landscape companies in the Columbus, Ohio, and Central Ohio areas. Environmental Management designs, builds and maintains hundreds of attractive, quality outdoor environments for both residential and commercial properties. Their experienced and hardworking professional staff provides the most comprehensive array of landscape services available in today’s marketplace – and they’re dedicated to exceeding expectations, everyday!

You’re Invited to the OIA Annual Meeting, January 16 at MGIX

The Ohio Irrigation Association (OIA) annual meeting, held in conjunction with MGIX 2017, will be followed by a FREE reception at Barley’s Brew House.

Meeting

email_sig_mgix17When: Monday, January 16

Time: 6:00 pm to 6:45 pm
(Reception following at Barley’s Brew House)

Where: The Greater Columbus Convention Center – Room C150

Reception – Free Beer, Wine and Food

draft-beer-979210_1920Join Ohio Irrigation Contractors

When: Monday, January 16

Time: 6:45 pm to whenever

Where: Barley’s Brew House, 467 N. High Street, Columbus, Ohio (across the street from the Convention Center)

Reception and Door Prizes Courtesy of HunterRain Bird and Toro

Don’t miss out on the best party of the year! Mingle with old friends, vendors, and manufacturers’ representatives. Hunter, Rain Bird, and Toro personnel will be there, as well as the Board of Directors for the Ohio Irrigation Association.

Find out how others fared through 2016. Learn about new products and old tricks. Get the latest news and views from experts. Companies from all over the state of Ohio will be represented.

We’ll See You There!

MGIX 2017, Ohio’s Premier Green Industry Trade Show, January 16-18

 

MGIX

Midwest Green Industry Xperience (MGIX) 2017 (formerly known as CENTS) is scheduled for three full days, January 16 through 18, 2017, at the Greater Columbus Convention Center. The event will combine industry-leading education with an expanded trade show, offering a truly innovative green industry experience.

Trade Show

This year’s trade show will feature more than 400 exhibitors, offering a wide range of products and services, including nursery stock, hardscaping products, pest and disease control, landscaping equipment, business services and more. The show is expected to attract more than 6,000 attendees.

MGIXThe expanded trade show will also offer:

  • Garden Promenade and Garden Lounge
  • The latest innovations in the New Product Showcase
  • “Are You Smarter Than a Green Industry Pro?” trivia game in the Garden Lounge.

Back by Popular Demand

Available again this year will be the ever-popular ONLA Garage, offering hands-on training to teach your team how to correctly operate, utilize and maintain your precious equipment for optimal performance and longevity. dscf5109-e1478540194841(The ONLA Garage is included with the purchase of a trade show pass.)

Also back this year will be Climbers Corners. This live-stage event features expert educators demonstrating a variety of arboricultural techniques important to tree work professionals, landscape crews, managers and designers.

Education

Educational sessions of particular interest to landscape and irrigation professionals will include:

  • MGIX“Integrated Pest Management in Lawns and Landscapes,” presented by Dave Shetlar, Professor of Urban Landscape Entomology, Ohio State University
  • “Sustainability Parts I, II and III,” presented by John DeVore, designer, landscape contractor and educator
  • “Landscaping for Climate Change,” presented by Kim Eierman, certified environmental horticulturist and master gardener
  • “The Landscape Sustainability Checklist,” presented by Stephen Foltz, Director of Horticulture, Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden
  • “Green Infrastructure for Stormwater Control,” presented by writer, consultant and educator Debra Knapke
  • “Planting from the Ground Up,” presented by Joe Boggs, Professor of Entomology, Ohio State University

Workshops

In addition, the following pre-conference workshops will be offered on Sunday, January 15:

  • oipcworkshopjuly16c-400_2_origAnnual P.L.A.N.T. Seminar (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.),  presented each winter by the Perennial Plant Association in partnership with Ohio State University Master Gardener Volunteers.
  • Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement Specialist (PICPS) Course (8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.), designed to educate experienced contractors about the differences between installing PICP versus regular interlocking concrete pavement systems.
  • Landscape Business Bootcamp (9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.), tailored to business owners, managers, employees and all those seeking to improve their expertise in the industry. The curriculum is based on GreenMark’s 4 Cores of Landscape Business Success:  Guiding the business, running the business, getting the business , and doing the business.

To Learn More…

For more information, including the education schedule and special events, Click Here.

email_sig_mgix17To register for MGIX 2017, Click Here.

To reserve a booth, Click Here.

 


Sources:

MGIX17.com

MGIX 2017 Planning Guide

Winterizing a Landscape Irrigation System

(Note: This article originally appeared in SportTurf Magazine)

Winter ImageThe dreary days of November remind us that it’s time to start thinking about preparing your irrigation systems for winter. Water expands when it freezes. Since automatic irrigation systems are usually buried only about twelve inches below the surface of the soil, water left in an irrigation system in freezing climates over the winter, even a mild winter, will certainly freeze — causing damage to pipes, fittings, valves, and sprinklers. Damage caused by a frozen irrigation system can be expensive and time consuming to repair next spring. Preventing winter damage by properly winterizing the irrigation system is important. Using compressed air to force water out of the irrigation system is the most common method of winterization. However, irrigation systems equipped with automatic or manual drain valves do not require compressed air to winterize. Only the installing contractor will know if an irrigation system is equipped with automatic or manual drain valves. If you are not sure what type of irrigation system you are winterizing, then use compressed air. Using compressed air on an irrigation system equipped with automatic or manual drain valves will not harm the components of the irrigation system, and will ensure the irrigation system is properly winterized.

Selecting an Air Compressor

Sulliar 185 Portable Air Compressor

Sulliar 185 Portable Air Compressor

A properly sized air compressor is critical in effectively and efficiently blowing air into the irrigation system, forcing any water out. Air compressors are available in various sizes. The most common portable air compressor, which represents roughly 80% of the portable air compressors going into rental fleets today, is the 185 portable air compressor. This machine is rated at 185 cfm at 100 psi at full load. You can find one through a contractors’ equipment rental shop that is more than adequate to get the job done for most residential and commercial irrigation systems. Smaller 5 h.p. electric air compressors, although capable of delivering 100 psi, are not capable of delivering enough volume of air to adequately winterize an irrigation system.

Compressed Air Winterization

The first step in winterizing an irrigation system is to shut off the water to the irrigation system at the point of connection. The system shut-off valve may be a ball valve or gate valve located in the basement or directly after the water meter. Then open a zone valve to relieve the system pressure. Attach the air hose from the air compressor to the blow-out point. The blow-out point is usually located directly after the backflow device. The blow-out point may be a quick coupling valve, a hose bib, or a boiler drain. In this technical drawing the blow-out connection is the quick-coupling valve located in the valve box.

A note of caution: The expanding air coming from the air compressor into the irrigation system will get hot and may melt the plastic pipe. Carefully check the temperature of the air-hose connection at the blow-out point. Slow down or stop momentarily if it feels too hot! Cycling through each zone two or three times for short intervals will prevent too much heat buildup.

 

Winterizing an irrigation system with compressed air

Air Compressor Settings

Set the pressure regulator on the air compressor at 50 to 80 psi. On smaller residential systems, where the zones are typically about 10 gpm or less, open one electric remote control valve manually and cycle through all the other zones two to three minutes by manually opening each valve or by electrically operating each valve at the controller. Opening one valve manually will help to keep the air com- pressor from building up too much pressure while assuring an adequate volume of air to thoroughly blow out all the water in the sys- tem. On larger systems it may not be necessary to open one valve manually. Allow the air to flow through each zone until water and water vapor no longer appears from any sprinklers in the zone. Start with the zone with the highest elevation in the system or farthest from the point of connection, blowing out each zone successively toward the point of connection. It is a good idea to cycle through each zone two times to ensure there is no water remaining that might settle into a low point in the lateral pipe.

Automatic Drain System Winterization

Although using compressed air is the most common method for winterizing an automatic irrigation system, there are two other types of automatic irrigation systems. The first type is a system equipped with automatic drains. The automatic drains open when the system pressure falls below 10 psi. For these systems it is usually only necessary to turn off the water. Open a drain valve after the point of connection. Prepare the backflow device and controller for winter as noted below. Some irrigation systems incorporate automatic drain valves on the laterals and manual drain valves on the main line. The manual drain valves will be located in small valve boxes at the end and at low points on the main line. Open the drain valves, and allow the water to drain out completely. Then close the drain valve.

Manual Drain System Winterization

An irrigation system equipped with manual drain valves requires you to locate the drain valve for each zone and the main line. The manual drain is usually located in a small valve box at the end of the zone and at every low point. Also, the main line will have a manual drain at the end of the line and at every low point. Open each drain valve, allowing all the water to drain out, and then close the manual drains. Winterize the back- flow device and irrigation controller as noted below.

Backflow Winterization

Backflow Installation Detail

Typical PVB backflow installation.

There are two backflow devices utilized in landscape irrigation systems. The most common is a pressure vacuum breaker. Open the top of the pressure vacuum breaker and remove the internal discs and springs. Storing these components near the irri- gation controller makes them easier to find next spring. Turn the handles on the two ball valves and all test ports to a partially open 45 degree position. Ball valves, when fully closed or fully open, will trap water in between the ball and the valve housing. The valve housing will crack during a freeze if not left partially open.

Some newer pressure vacuum breakers are freeze resistant, with a built-in relief valve to protect the internal components and the body from freezing. It is not necessary to remove the internal components in these devices.

The other type of backflow device used in irrigation system is a reduced pressure principle backflow device, or RPZ. It is usually best to remove this device completely during the winter and store indoors. Then cap the pipes to the irrigation system. If removal of the RPZ back- flow device is not possible, carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions for winterization. Each manufacturer has specific instructions for winterizing their reduced pressure principle backflow device.

Irrigation Controller and Rain Sensor Winterization

To prepare the irrigation controller for winter, simply turn the contoller to the off or rain shutdown position. You can also disconnect the power and remove the battery but this is not necessary. It is important not to allow the controller to cycle through an irrigation schedule without water in the system because the remote-control valves require water to move through the solenoid assembly to cool the assembly.

If your irrigation system is equipped with a rain sensor or a soil moisture sensor, it is not usually necessary to cover or remove the sensor for the winter. Check with the manufacturer to make sure the sensor does not require any special instructions for win- terization.

Pump Winterization

Submersible pumps, located in a lake or stream, have a check valve at the pump which needs to be removed to make certain the discharge hose does not freeze. It is adviseable to simply remove the pump and discharge hose from water each winter, reinstalling it in the spring.

Centrifigal pumps have a drain valve located at the base of the pump housing that needs to be removed and stored for the winter. The power supply for the pump should also be disconnect- ed to prevent the pump from being accidentally turned on with- out any water. A pump running without water will quickly burn up. Additionally, if the pump is drawing water from a lake or stream, the intake hose has a foot valve located at the base of the suction line. So it is necessary to remove the intake or suction line completely from the water and store it for the winter. Sometimes a check valve is also located on the discharge side of the pump. This check valve needs to be removed and stored for the winter.

Preparing an irrigation system for winter can be a complicated process. A knowledgeable professional is essential to minimize freezing water damage. An improperly winterized irrigation system can be an expensive proposition next spring.

Internet-Based Smart Irrigation Systems

Internet-based smart irrigation system technology is rapidly expanding throughout the industry, particularly for residential usage.web-based

Internet-based smart irrigation system technology is even featured in Forbes magazine, “Tired Of Wasting Water With That Dumb Sprinkler? Meet The Smart Sprinkler Controller.” This irrigation system technology allows residential users to control and monitor their sprinkler systems from anywhere in the world using a web browser or iPhone/Android app. It also uses the homeowner’s wireless internet (wifi) to access a live stream from nearby weather stations.  As a result, residential users are provided with real-time weather data, without the need to install a personal weather station or rain sensor.

lawn1Using adaptive algorithms to generate custom and dynamic watering schedules from this weather data, the smart controller automatically determines the optimal watering schedule for the irrigation site. The system automatically adjusts watering cycles, duration and frequency for optimal results in any weather condition. Some smart controllers will even take into consideration local watering restrictions.

swat_logoWeb-based irrigation systems are certifiable through both the EPA’s WaterSense program and the Irrigation Association’s Smart Water Application Technologies (SWAT) testing.  For a comparison of WaterSense and SWAT testing protocols, click here.

Let’s take a look at some of the web-based irrigation systems currently available…


Skydrop

Skydrop’s WiFi-based smart controller entered the market in September of 2014. The company is based in Lehi, Utah, and promotes its product as helping residential users to abide by local watering restrictions. (“Don’t be a lawn bandit, and don’t risk hefty fines.”) According to Skydrop, the typical homeowner can install and set up its controller in less than 30 minutes.

Malibu-GardenIn addition to using real-time weather data, the Skydrop smart controller also measures soil moisture to determine how much water the landscape is losing.  Like most other internet-based systems, the Skydrop device is programmed by zone according to soil type, plant type, sprinkler type, slope and shape. The  Skydrop controller can also be integrated with other smart home systems such alarm controllers, solar heating/cooling, and outdoor lighting.

logo-90The controller includes a “cycle and soak” feature to eliminate or reduce runoff when landscapes are sloped. The company claims that watering each zone separately and only when required results in an average reduction in water usage of 35%. The Skydrop smart controller has qualified for the EPA’s WaterSense® Certification, yet the company does not plan to pursue SWAT testing at this time.

The Skydrop controller operates eight zones plus a master valve/pump, and is expandable to 16 zones with an expansion unit. The retail price for the Skydrop 8-zone controller is around $300, and the expansion unit retails for $50.


Hydrawise (Hunter Industries)

flowerHydrawise was recently purchased by Hunter Industries. The Hydrawise smart controller provides interactive online reporting and alerts that allow the user to view water usage for each watering cycle or the water flow rate at any time. Email alerts notify the user of water flows (e.g., due to a broken pipe or faulty valve) when no zone is currently running. Alerts can also be configured when the water usage for an irrigation zone changes by more than 10% (such as, from broken spray heads or faulty wiring).

Hydrawise2ColorTrim260Hydrawise is one of the products which does not require port forwarding on the user’s router in order to control the irrigation system from anywhere in the world. Rather, wireless functionality is provided inside the controller; the user enters a wireless password on the controller itself.

hydrawiseAccording to Chris Foster, Midwest Sales Manager for Hunter, the Hydrawise system utilizes Cloud technology, allowing the residential user and support technician to “meet in the cloud,” thereby preventing any potential security risks.  “Hydrawise is fourth-generation technology,” he said.

The Hydrawise controller is available in 6- or 12-zone models; expansion modules allow an individual system to be expanded up to 36 zones. The product is WaterSense certified and was the winner of  The Australian Backyard Innovation Challenge in 2015. Hydrawise has not been SWAT tested. Pricing is available through a Hunter distributor.

According to Michael White, Vice President of Turf & Landscape Sales for Automatic Irrigation Supply, one of the best features of the Hydrawise system is the professional support that is now available through Hunter Industries.


Cyber Rain

The Cyber Rain smart controller is manufactured by Israel-based Galcon, which is owned by Kibbutz Kfar Blum.  According to the company, Cyber Rain was the very first central irrigation product to earn the EPA WaterSense certification (in 2012). It also claims that the Cyber Rain controller can reduce water costs by up to 40% annually. Cyber Rain is SWAT approved.

LogoCyberRain1Cyber Rain supplies a small device called an “Access Point” that is plugged into a router so that the controller can access the internet using Cloud technology. The Access Point communicates with an unlimited number of Cyber Rain controllers through its own two-way wireless network. The standard radio can communicate up to 200 feet, while the longer-range radio can reach up to two miles with the optional antenna.

downloadCyber Rain offers a Smart Scheduling Wizard to set up the water-wise irrigation schedule customized to the particular landscape. For zones with dense soil or on a slope, for instance, the Cyber Rain smart controller offer a cycle and soak feature to avoid run-off.

Controllers are available in 8-, 16- and 24-zone models. (The optional antenna can be attached to increase range.) Prices for the residential systems range from $500 to $600.  Professional installation is not required for the residential systems, but appears to be recommended.


Rachio

Rachio introduced its first product (“Iro”) in 2014; Iro is an intelligent irrigation controller that is powered by Rachio’s cloud-based software.  It an be rachio-logo-for-web-300px (1)controlled either through a web-based dashboard or through an intuitive Android or iPhone app. During setup, the homeowner’s smartphone sends a signal to the Iro, connecting it to the internet through a WiFi network. It then communicates with Rachio’s cloud-based software. The company claims that installation and setup take less than 30 minutes with no special tools or expertise required.

The Iro will automatically check the local weather forecast and issue adjustments based on evapotranspiration and precipitation data to match soil moisture depletion. The Iro also learns from the customer’s adjustments over time. As a result, users can personalize the balance between water use and the level of plant health in each zone.

Irrigation-Flowers013Iro’s Smart Cycle will automatically schedule cycle and soak irrigation events to eliminate or reduce runoff when landscapes are sloped and/or the infiltration rate of the soil is less than that of the precipitation rate of the nozzle for the given zone. A virtual rain sensor will suspend irrigation events if rain is forecasted within the next 24 hours.

Iro controllers are available in 8-zone ($199) and 16-zone ($249) models. The Iro system has received the EPA’s WaterSense certification. Rachis is SWAT tested and has earned the prestigious EPA WaterSense label for irrigation efficiency.

Comparison of Residential Web-Based Smart Irrigation Controllers

 SkydropHydrawiseCyber RainRachio
SmartPhone CompatibleYesYesYesYes
Ipad/PC CompatibleYesYesNoYes
Android CompatibleYesYesYesYes
Uses Real-time Weather DataYesYesYesYes
Provides Online ReportingYesYesYesYes
Uses Cloud TechnologyYesYesYesYes
WaterSense CertifiedYesYesYesYes
SWAT TestedYesNoYesYes
Do-It-Yourself InstallationYesNo
YesYes
Professional SupportNoYesNoYes
Interfaces with Other Home SystemsYesYesNoYes
Includes Cycle and Soak FeatureYesYesYesYes
No. of Zones Available8, 166, 12*8, 168, 16
Price$299.99-$348.99 $260.00-$310.00$499.00-$599.00$199.00-$249.00

*May be expanded up to 36 zones.


The Future

Having recently attended a trade function focused on what water management will look like in the year 2065, Automatic Irrigation’s Michael White firmly believes that the web-based systems are crucial to allowing homeowners to be better stewards of water resources.  “Twenty-five years from now, water will cost much more than it does today,” he said. Consequently, “These new systems are good for the consumer and they’re good for the industry.”

(Editor’s note: Rachio’s data was corrected and updated from the original post based on additional information provided by the manufacturer.)


Sources:

U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation, “Weather- and Soil Moisture-Based Landscape Irrigation Scheduling Devices”

“Using Your Smarts” With Smart Irrigation Controllers Featuring JC Wheaton

Lawn & Landscape January 2016 CoverJ.C. Wheaton, President of the Ohio Irrigation Association and manager of Centerville Irrigation in Ohio, was recently featured in Lawn & Landscape’s article entitled, “Total Control.” Smart Irrigation controllers are the next step in the efficient use of water in the landscape.

J.C. was interviewed about Smart Irrigation Controllers, calling the new technology “the responsible thing to do.”

JC Wheaton Head & ShouldersWheaton’s company installs a controller with a smart sensor, capable of sensing local weather conditions. The sensor then automatically alerts the controller to the current conditions, eliminating the need for human manipulation.  This is something customers appreciate, because “it saves them from either having to go to the box themselves or calling us for a return trip,” Wheaton said.

One-Stop Service

Customers also love the fact that the system is a “one-stop” service that automatically adjusts to the temperature.   “They don’t have to go out three times or four times a season to adjust everything.”  He considers this the system’s strongest selling point for new customers.  “You’re saving them the hassle with keeping the property the way they want,” he said.

While Wheaton admits that the smart controller system costs more than a traditional controller (still less than $100), he believes the energy and water savings make it a much better long-term deal.

More Commercial Use Needed

commerical-sprinklersWhich is one reason he hopes commercial architects and designers will jump on board to maximize efficiency of their designs.  Right now, the smart controller systems are not very well stocked on commercial projects, and that’s resulting in poor efficiency.  “You see them all the time running in the rain, no matter what town you’re in,” Wheaton says. “Running too long, running in the gutter…because they were not put in correctly with the right components.”

The Down Side?

One of the potential drawbacks to the smart controller system is losing control of when the zones are running. “You’re basically turning that over to the clock to make those decisions, which isn’t always a bad thing. But sometimes the homeowner or resident wants to know their irrigation schedule and you can’t necessarily tell them that,” Wheaton said.

Companies will also see fewer mid-season service calls. Contractors who are concerned about that are probably not the type who will benefit from using the smart control system, Wheaton said.  “It’s about the efficiency of getting the best product to your customer. Those callbacks can be used other ways, such as zoning and monthly business checks.”


Source:

Lawn & Landscape, http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/article/total-control/

 

Every Drop Counts…July Is Smart Irrigation Month

water

It’s that time of year again…July is Smart Irrigation Month and, as usual, there are many ways  for businesses and consumers to participate in the campaign.

First launched in 2005, Smart Irrigation Month continues to gain traction each year as consumers and irrigation specialists alike recognize the positive impact efficient irrigation and water use provides to all of us.

Give this a try!

Place a few empty tuna cans around your lawn while you’re watering and measure how long it takes your sprinkler to fill them with a half inch of water. Then, try watering that amount of time twice a week, gauge how your landscape responds, and adjust based on weather conditions. Or simplify by replacing your standard clock timer controller with a WaterSense labeled irrigation controller.

Smart Systems

Among the strategies being presented to consumers, first and foremost is proper programming of automatic watering or sprinkler systems to deliver just the right amount of water at the right time. Additional strategies include:

  • smartProper landscaping, keeping soil healthy, mulching and routine landscape maintenance
  • Investing in an irrigation system that uses the best, most flexible, components, has “smart” controls, and meets code requirements
  • Watering during the evening and early morning to prevent evaporation, taking soil type and sprinkler placement into consideration
  • Maintaining the sprinkler system regularly by adjusting sprinkler heads, repairing leaks and monitoring pressure

WaterSense

According the the EPA’s WaterSense website, adopting water–savvy habits also is essential to maintaining and extending our communities’ water supplies, especially during peak use. WaterSense partners with manufacturers, retailers/distributors, and utilities to bring high-performing, water-efficient products to the marketplace. WaterSense also partners with professional certifying organizations to promote water–efficient landscape irrigation practices. Since the program began in 2006, WaterSense has helped consumers save a total of 1.5 trillion gallons of water, resulting in more than $32.6 billion in water and energy bill savings.

Smart Ideas

Since July is the peak month for water consumption, the national Smart Irrigation campaign is encouraging industrial firms and professionals to promote smart irrigation practices and technologies, as well.   Here are some of the many  “Smart Ideas” to promote the national campaign that are listed on the Irrigation Association website:

  • SIM_LogoAdd the Smart Irrigation Month logo to your web site, ads, customer presentations, field signs, invoices and more.
  • Submit a press release or letter to the editor of your local newspaper.
  • Ask employees to add the Smart Irrigation Month logo to their e-mail signature block.
  • Hand out Smart Irrigation Month bumper stickers at your next contractor meeting.
  • Host a live demonstration of water-saving irrigation technologies, in the field or at your location.
  • Feature water-efficient products and services in displays, ads, promotions and product demos with the Smart Irrigation Month logo.
  • Use a banner, outside signage or counter sign to encourage customers to ask about how smart irrigation can save water and money.
  • Smart Irrigation Controller RebateMake smart irrigation the theme of sales calls.
  • Stick a Smart Irrigation Month label on every box that goes out the door.
  • Give awards to customers and/or business partners who promote water-efficient practices.
  • Volunteer to speak to a local homeowner association, garden club or civic group.
  • Distribute copies of the Smart Irrigation Month coloring book at a farmers market or county fair.
  • Ask your local radio station to play a public service announcement, promoting July as Smart Irrigation Month.

What are YOU doing to promote Smart Irrigation Month?  Remember…Every Drop Counts!


Sources:

Irrigation Association, http://www.irrigation.org/Resources/SmartIrrigationMonth/SmartIdeas.aspx

EPA WaterSense,  https://www3.epa.gov/watersense/pubs/efficient.html

 

 

Help Wanted – Irrigation Installation Foreman Columbus, Ohio Area

Environmental Management LogoEnvironmental Management, Columbus, Ohio
Help Wanted – Experienced Landscape Irrigaiton Installation Foreman

Irrigation Installation Foreman needed for installing and maintaining underground irrigation systems for both residential and commercial clients according to EMI standard operating procedures.

Position requires previous irrigation experience and/or electrical experience.  Foreman works in cooperation with Landscape Design/Sales, Landscape Division Operations Manager, with quality and customer satisfaction as top priority.

Communicates and resolves all issues related to installation to ensure the installation meets the specifications of the design and client.  Able to properly maintain and complete daily paperwork needed to report service activities to customers and EMI administration.  Able and willing to communicate with customer when needed.

Position may require working off hours and weekends to service residential clients.  Must be available to work extended hours, weekends and during inclement weather.

The employee must provide leadership and work direction for Irrigation Crew Laborers.  They are responsible for vehicle operation, equipment operation and adherence to EMI established safety procedures.

Salary based on experience, ranging from $17.00 to $25.00 an hour

For more information on available career opportunities, please call EMI Employee Services at 614.876.9988, or visit us at www.landscapepros.com.


About Environmental Management

Environmental Management Inc. is one of the largest landscape companies in the Columbus, Ohio, and Central Ohio areas. Environmental Management designs, builds and maintains hundreds of attractive, quality outdoor environments for both residential and commercial properties. Their experienced and hardworking professional staff provides the most comprehensive array of landscape services available in today’s marketplace – and they’re dedicated to exceeding expectations, everyday!

Help Wanted – Irrigation/Lighting Foreman in Columbus, Ohio

5494a2767d5216.13490718Are you tired of working for the large company where you are just a number?

Are you looking for a place where your skills will be valued and where you can help grow your career and an entire division?

Do you believe you deserve better?

Hidden Creek Landscaping is currently seeking a motivated individual who has the skills to move into the role of Irrigation/Lighting Foreman to help add the finishing touch to projects. WE WILL TRAIN the right person that fits our culture, so come join our team with a brand new facility, the best equipment, and award winning creative projects that will challenge and excite you each day – We believe you deserve better!

Specific Job Responsibilities:

  • Working with and supervising 2-4 person crew or work individually (as needed)
  • Irrigation-drainage-lighting-and water feature installation and repair for residential and commercial clients
  • Coordinating with Project Manager to implement Blueprints for new Irrigation systems
  • Communication with clients, contractors, and your team on deadlines and tasks for each day
  • Organization of materials, equipment, and personnel before, during, and after project
  • Detailed Record keeping of Services to be billed using hand held computer software
  • Snow work in winter months

Benefits

  • Year round position – $15.00-$19.00/hour based on experience
  • Snow Bonus compensation
  • Paid Holidays/Vacation
  • Health/Dental Insurance and Retirement IRA plan
  • Company cell phone provided

Qualifications

  • Knowledge or ability to learn and operate equipment such as a Trencher, multi-meter, wire tracer and other applicable installation equipment
  • Reading and implementing Construction Blueprints and AutoCAD Drawings
  • Ability to use mobile phone to input hours and materials each day
  • Valid Driver’s license and ability to drive under company insurance mandatory (No more than 4 Points, no DUI)

Click Here to Apply Online

OR SEND RESUME TO

Email Resume

teamintro2


Hidden Creek Landscaping Inc. is a design-build company that has been serving the Columbus metropolitan area since 1998. We currently have openings for our landscape installation and landscape management divisions.

To apply, please fill out an application online and call our job hotline at (614) 721-3212.

Ohio Irrigation Association 2016 Election Results

Board of Directors2016 Annual Election Results

The Ohio Irrigation Association is please to announce the election of the following individuals to the Officers and Board of Directors positions for 2016:

Ohio Irrigation Association Officers 2016

 PositionNameCompany PhoneCity/State
JC Wheaton PortraitPresidentJ. C. WheatonCenterville Landscaping(937) 433-5395Centerville, Ohio
Renzo DiFrancoVice PresidentRenzo DiFrancoIrrigation Pro, Inc.(440) 572-6600Columbia Station, Ohio
John Newlin, Secretary, Ohio Irrigation AssociationSecretaryJohn NewlinQuality Sprinkling Systems, Inc.(440) 327-1936North Ridgeville, Ohio
John DolleTreasurerJohn B. DolleRainscapes Irrigation Services(937) 313-6644Springboro, Ohio

Board of Directors 2016

 NameCompany PhoneCity/State
Justin HeilBuckeye/O-Heil Site Solutions(937) 432-9911Dayton, Ohio
Kris KeckleyKris KeckleyRain One Irrigation & Drainage(614) 759-1196Blacklick, Ohio
Scott KnowlesScott KnowlesWolf Creek Company(937) 854-2694
(800) 488-7305 toll-free
Trotwood, Ohio
Dave Matthews PortraitDave MatthewsSimmons Landscape and Irrigation, Inc(419) 868-9766Holland, Ohio
Tim OwenTim OwenSiteOne Landscape Supply(614) 989-3839
(800) 347-4272 toll-free
Columbus, Ohio
(with locations throughout the U.S.)

 

IA Certified Irrigation Contractor Training

Irrigation Association Certified Irrigation Contractor Training

March 8th and 9th, 2016 – 8:00 a.m to 5 p.m.

*Exam – March 10th 8:00 a.m. to noon (seperate registration with the IA is required 14 days in advance. Click here to register for the exam.)

Eventbrite - IA Certified Irrigation Contractor Training

Location

Wolf Creek
6700B Huntly Road
Columbus, Ohio 43229

phone: (614) 985-3070
fax: (614) 985-3099
toll-free: (888) 690-1864


Presented by The Wolf Creek Company and the Ohio Irrigation Association

Certification gives you a competitive edge. Become a certified irrigation contractor and:

  • Add instant credibility with customers and employers.
  • Increase job opportunities.
  • Demonstrate your commitment to efficient water management.
  • Qualify for the EPA WaterSense program.

CIC Overview

  • CICs install, maintain and repair irrigation systems. CICs:
  • Execute irrigation projects to meet all specifications and requirements.
  • Prepare installation sites, including layout, staking, excavation, boring, trenching, grading and back-filling.
  • Cut and join pipe, know the limitations of different piping systems, and understand basic hydraulics.
  • Lay out and install piping and water delivery components; backflow prevention components; mechanical, hydraulic and electrical irrigation controls; and other irrigation system components.
  • Troubleshoot and repair irrigation components and systems.
  • Understand good business practices; construction contracts and their legal rights and obligations; and licensing laws and codes in their state.

Becoming a CIC

To become a CIC, you must:

  • Register for the exam. Minimum requirement: three years of irrigation-related field experience.
  • Pass the irrigation contractor exam. The 3-1/2-hour exam includes 150 equally-weighted, multiple choice questions on irrigation design, irrigation installation, irrigation scheduling, water management and conservation, maintenance and repair, federal laws and codes, and general business management. Candidates have three and a half hours to complete the exam.
  • Comply with the Select Certified Code of Ethics.
  • Remain in good standing. CICs must submit 20 continuing education units per 2-year cycle.

REGISTER for the EXAM Seperately – March 10, 2016 from 8 a.m. to Noon

CLICK HERE to REGISTER FOR THE EXAM

Sponsored by The Wolf Creek Company and the Ohio Irrigation Association


Cost – $150 includes book and lunch (contractors who complete the calss will recieve $100 Wolf Creek Credit)

Eventbrite - IA Certified Irrigation Contractor Training

New Ohio Law Regulates Booster Pumps

A new Ohio law regulates Booster Pumps

Water PumpIn summary, this new law requires the following for booster pumps installed on a water service connection:

  • The booster pump must be equipped with a low pressure cut-off device set to 10psi.
  • The low pressure cut-off device must be tested at least every 12 months.
  • The supplier must maintain electronic or paper records of all booster pumps installed for five years.

This law went into effect October 2015. Here is the complete text of the law:

3745-95-07 Booster pumps.

(A) No person shall install or maintain a water service connection where a booster pump has been installed, unless an approved method is in place and is operational to maintain a minimum suction pressure as prescribed as presented in the following:

(1) For booster pumps not intended to be used for fire supression, no person shall install or maintain a water service connection to any premises where a booster pump has been installed on the service line to or within such premises, unless such booster pump is equipped with a low pressure cut-off desinged to shut-off the booster pump when the pressure in the service line on the suction side of the pump drops to ten pounds per square inch gauge or less.

(2) For booster pumps used for fire suppression, also referred to as fire pumps, installed after August 8, 2008, no person shall install or maintain a water service connection to any premises where a fire pump has been installed on the service line to or within such premises, unless the pump is equpped with one of the following:

(a) A low suction throttling valve which is a pilot-operated valve installed in the discharge piping that maintains positive pressure in the suction piping, while monitoring pressure in the suction piping through a sensing line. The valve must throttle the discharge of the pump when necessary so that suction pressure will not be reduced below ten pounds per square inch gauge while the pump is operating.

(b) A variable speed suction limiting control which is a speed control system used to maintain a minimum positive suction pressure at the pump inlet by reducing the pump driver speed while monitoring pressure in the suction piping through a sensing line. It will be set so that the suction pressure will not be reduced below ten pounds per square inch gauge while the pump is operating.

(3) For booster pumps used for fire supression, also referred to as fire pumps, installed prior to August 8, 2008, which are equipped with a low pressure cut-off as defined in paragraph (A)(1) of this rule, are not required to modify the installation solely for the purpose of meeting the new methods accepted after this date, under paragraph (B)(1) of this rule.

(B) It shall be the duty of the water consumer to maintain the low pressure cut-off device, the low suction throttling valve, or the variable speed suction limiting control in proper working order and to certify to the supplier of water, at least once every twelve months that the minimum suction pressure sustaining method is operable and maintained in continuous operation.

(C) The supplier of water must maintain electronic or paper records of inventory of booster pump installations. Electronic or paper records certifying operation must be retained for a period of five years.

(D) The provisions of this rule shall be followed notwithstanding inconsistent provisions in the Great Lakes-Upper Mississippi river board of state and provincial public health and environmental manangers’ or “Recommended Standards for Water Works” (2012).Recommended Standards for Water Works (2012)

[Comment: “Recommended Standards for Water Works” 2012 edition. Copies are available from “Ohio EPA, Lazarus Government Center, 50 West Town Street, Suite 700, Columbus, OH 43215, (614) 644-2752” or online at http://10statesstandards.com or www.epa.ohio.gov/ddagw.]

Replaces: 3745-95-07

Effective: 10/26/2015
Five Year Review (FYR) Dates: 10/26/2020
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 6109.04
Rule Amplifies: 6109.046109.13
Prior Effective Dates: 07/01/72, 11/26/80, 05/01/03, 08/08/08

WaterSense® Program Accomplishments

U.S. EPA WaterSense® Program Accomplishments

Since the program’s inception in 2006, WaterSense has grown dramatically. Here are some of their most significant accomplishments:

  • The program has more than 1,613 organizational partners.
  • The program has helped consumers save a cumulative1 trillion gallons of water, resulting in saving over $21.7 billion in water and energy bills.
  • Through the use of labeled products, by the end of 2014 reductions of 146 billion kWh of electricity and 54 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were achieved.
  • The  labeled products program has proven to be overwhelmingly successful. Originally there were twenty-two labeled products. Today, the label is found on more than 1,600 models of showerheads, 1,900 models of tank-type toilets, 6,800 models of faucet or faucet accessory models, and 150 models of weather–based irrigation controllers.

Water Savings

  • Labeled products that are 20 percent more water-efficient and perform as well as or better than standard models.
  • Labeled faucets—or aerators that can be installed on existing bathroom faucets—are about 30 percent more efficient than standard faucets while still providing sufficient flow.
  • Labeled toilets use 20 percent less water per flush but perform as well as or better than today’s standard toilets and older toilets that use much more water.

Key Milestones

  • The launch of the Single-Family New Home Specification, and the first labeled homes entered the market in December of 2009. As of the end of 2014, the total number of  labeled homes across the country is at 449.
  • Celebrated their eight annual Partner of the Year awards in October 2015.
Lisa Jackson

Lisa Jackson

“The WaterSense® program is a great way of empowering consumers to make a difference for our environment. WaterSense continues to raise awareness about the value of smart water use and, by growing our green economy, is moving the marketplace to preserve one of our most precious resources.”

– Lisa P. Jackson, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator

2014 WaterSense Accomplishments

 

 


Program Accomplishment Sources:

http://www3.epa.gov/watersense/about_us/milestones.html

http://www3.epa.gov/watersense/about_us/facts.html

What is WaterSense®?

What is U.S. EPA WaterSense®?

EPA WaterSens LogoLaunched in June of 2006, the EPA’s WaterSense program created a goal to educate the public and consumers in the importance of water conservation. During the 2006 American Water Works Association’s Annual Conference and Exposition in San Antonio, Texas, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson informed, “Commercial and residential outdoor water use in the United States accounts for more than seven billion gallons of water each day, mainly for landscape irrigation.” The EPA estimates over three and a half billion gallons of water are wasted every day from inefficient and ineffective landscape irrigation practices. More than fifty percent of irrigation water used in residential and commercial irrigation systems is wasted.

The EPA’s WaterSense Program is a program designed to promote water conservation and the efficient use of water through education, not regulation. There are four primary features of the program.

Consumer Education

WaterSense is working towards protecting our nation’s water supply by educating consumers and businesses in water efficient practices, programs, and products.

FixALeakWeekThe Fix a Leak Week campaign, held annually in March, is one of the ways WaterSense is bringing water conservation awareness to the public. The EPA reports that the average American home leaks over 10,000 gallons of water each year. Nationally, this represents over 1 trillion gallons of water lost.

We’re for Water” campaign was launched to encourage consumers to make simple changes to save water. The cornerstone of the campaign is a series of print public service announcements featuring Flo, the WaterSense spokesgallon. The public outreach campaign traveled the country passing out 500 WaterSense labeled aerator faucets in order to raise awareness about how easy water conservation can be at home.

We're for WaterAs part of the “We’re for Water” campaign, the “I’m for Water” program asks individuals to take a pledge and commit to checking off one or more simple tasks each month to save precious water resources. The program provides tips on how to use less water and spend less on utility bills.

Professional Certification Programs

EPA Watersense Product LogoIrrigation professionals can earn a WaterSense labeled certification by demonstrating expertise in water-efficient irrigation technology and techniques. The specifications cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

Irrigation professionals can distinguish themselves from competitors through certification and a documented commitment to the program of water efficiency. Certified irrigation professionals are listed in WaterSense’s Directory of Certified Professionals, making it easy for consumers and businesses to find local irrigation experts.

The Irrigation Association’s certification program was the first certifying partner to be approved by the EPA. The following is a list of professional certification programs that have earned the WaterSense label[1].

Irrigation System Design

§  Certified Irrigation Designer (CID) (landscape/turf specialties only) – Offered by the Irrigation Association, available nationwide.

§ Irrigation System Installation and Maintenance

§  Certified Irrigation Contractor (CIC) – Offered by the Irrigation Association, available nationwide.

Irrigation System Audits

§  Certified Golf Irrigation Auditor (CGIA) – Offered by the Irrigation Association, nationwide.

§  Certified Landscape Irrigation Auditor (CLIA) – Offered by the Irrigation Association, available nationwide.

§  Certified Water Management Program – Offered by the California Landscape Contractors Association, available in California.

§  Qualified Water Efficient Landscaper (QWEL) – Offered by the Sonoma–Marin Saving Water Partnership, available in California, Utah, New Mexico, Florida, Wyoming. Available for adoption nationwide.

§  Texas Certified Landscape Irrigation Auditor Program (TxCLIA) – Offered by Texas A&M AgrilLife Extension Service, Texas A&M School of Irrigation, available in Texas.

§  Watershed Wise Landscape Professional (WWLP) – Offered by G3LA, LLC, available in California and west of the Rocky Mountains.

Product Labeling

Products that carry the WaterSense label generally demonstrate a 20% water savings over conventional products. WaterSense labeled products are tested by independent, third party testing and certification agencies. The certification process is rigorous, assuring consumers that a WaterSense labeled product will deliver exceptional performance and water savings.

WaterSense has issued final product specifications and technical clarifications for the following product categories[2]:

WaterSense New Home GraphicNew Home Specification

The WaterSense New Home Specification is designed to reduce residential water use, both indoors and outdoors, when compared to a conventional new home. The program focuses on hot water, as well as water use in the bathroom, kitchen, and landscaping.

American homes average 75 gallons of water use per person per day. The EPA claims that compared to an existing home, a WaterSense labeled home could save more than $200 per year on water and energy bills. The WaterSense New Home Specification works well with other green building programs like ENERGY STAR, LEED®, and the National Green Building Standard.

The water we use everyday is vital and limited. We as an industry have both an opportunity and a responsibility to increase our water conservation efforts. The EPA’s WaterSense program has proven we can increase water efficiency and develop practices that help preserve this precious resource. To find out more about the benefits of a WaterSense labeled home and the latest in program news, read the WaterSense Blueprint, a quarterly update dedicated to news and events related to WaterSense labeled new homes.



[1] http://www3.epa.gov/watersense/outdoor/cert_programs.html

[2] http://www3.epa.gov/watersense/partners/product_program_specs.html

 

Andy Smith, 50, an Irrigation Industry Leader, Dies

Andrew SmithA Leader in the Irrigation Industry

It is with deep sorrow we announce that Andy Smith passed away Thursday, Mar 14, 2015 after a brief battle with cancer.

Andy was well-known and a staunch advocate in the irrigation industry, the industry that he spent his entire career in. Andy started his career in irrigation working for Eric Gutenberg and Brian MacDonell, owners of Traverse Outdoor in Traverse City, Michigan.

Traverse Outdoor & Smith Irrigation

Several years after working for Traverse Outdoor, Andy started his own landscape irrigation company, Smith Irrigation, in Boyne City, Michigan. In 2003, Andy continued his irrigation contracting career when he became co-owner of Boyne Turf & Horticulture.

andrewsmith5Lobbyist for the Irrigation Association

In 2005, Andy became the External Affairs Director for the Irrigation Association where he legislative and regulatory affairs at a national level. The Irrigation Association is the leading national trade association of the irrigation industry.

Rick Bechtel, Business Strategist and Executive Consultant for Betchel Consulting Group, worked with Andy at the Irrigation Association and summarized Andy’s work with the Irrigation Association best:

“If I were asked to name one person who had made such an impact on an organization as to become synonymous with it, that individual would be Andy Smith, with the Irrigation Association.

I don’t think it’s possible to estimate the number of members who have joined because of Andy, the favorable legislation that has passed because of his efforts, the degree of organization he has incited within the industry, or the goodwill that he has generated.

But as a member who worked closely with him on several initiatives, I can say that I have rarely met someone with his combination of intelligence, diplomacy and drive. The association – and the industry – owe him a great debt.”

–Rick Bechtel, President, Bechtel Consulting Group

After working for the Irrigation Association, Andy went on to become the National Accounts Manager for Reinke Irrigation. Reinke Irrigation, headquartered in Deshler, Nebraska, is a worldwide leader in agricultural irrigation with offices and manufacturing facilities in North America, South America, Asia, and Africa.

Director of Industry Relations

In 2013, Andy became Director of Industry Relations for Valmont Industries. Valmont, headquartered in Lincoln, Nebraska, leads the world in mechanized irrigation equipment for agriculture.

Andy is survived by his wife Kim and his seventeen year old daughter, Madison.

In lieu of flowers, memorials to honor Andrew may be put towards his daughter’s college fund. Donations can be sent to Madison Smith at Fifth-Third Bank 102 S. Lake Street, Boyne City MI 49712; account number 7975077475.

Visitation will take place on Wednesday, May 20th, at Stackus Funeral Home, in Boyne City, Michigan, from 4-7 p.m.

Funeral services will take place on Thursday, May 21st at 200 p.m. at Walloon Lake Community Church, Walloon Lake, Michigan.

Click Here for More Information

Family and friends wishing to share a thought or memory of Andrew are encouraged to do so online at www.stonefuneralhomeinc.com

19157_1088864558901_8107938_n

JR Houston Estimating Workshop for Irrigation Contractors February 18th

Estimating System Overview

In this workshop Landscape and Irrigation contractors will be Introduced to the key components of an effective estimating system.  The pros and cons of each of the six most common methods of estimating used in the market today are discussed in depth.

Training PuzzleWHERE

Ohio Turfgrass Research and Education Facility
2710 North Star Road
Columbus, Ohio 43221

Click Here for Directions

WHEN

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 from 7:45 AM to 5:00 PM (EST)

COST

$50 – Ohio Irrigation Association Members
$150 – Non-members

Eventbrite - JR Houston Estimating Workshop for Irrigation Contractors

Those who attend will be provided with a detailed explanation of the key principles involved in:
• The estimating budget process
• Calculating and controlling equipment costs
• Calculating labor burden and average wages
• Measuring, allocating, and controlling general and administrative overhead costs
• Reviewing a bid
• Determining general conditions costs in a bid
• Understanding market predisposition
• Understanding the six most common methods of estimating used n the market

Estimating Excel Workbook

Landscape and Irrigation contractors and/or key staff will learn how to use J.R. Huston Enterprises’ MS Excel worksheets (attendees will have to have their own computer) to:

  • Prepare a general and administrative (G&A) overhead and field-labor hour budget
  • Calculate labor burden, average wage, and equipment costs
  • Price/bid projects by the lump sum method
  • Measure, allocate, and control G&A overhead costs
  • Understand the total quality management (TQM) process as it relates to estimating
  • Understand the six most common methods of estimating used in the market today
  • And more…

Attendees will need:

  • A laptop computer with MS Excel and a CD drive
  • A calculator (with extension cord if necessary)
  • Note pad, pens and pencils
  • State unemployment rate *
  • Workers’ compensation insurance (WCI) rates/policy *
  • General liability insurance rates/policy *
  • Medical insurance costs
  • Most recent year-end Profit & Loss (P&L) statement *
  • Current year P&L (if available) *
            * Approximate numbers provided by Jim Huston for start-up companies

 

Eventbrite - JR Houston Estimating Workshop for Irrigation Contractors

Cincinnati Certified Irrigation Expo – February 11 & 12

Ohio Irrigation Association Presents Certified Irrigation Expo

Training ClassWHEN

Wednesday & Thursday, February 11 & 12, 2105

COST

$100 per person – Two Day CIC Training & Vendor Dine Around
$80 per person – One Day CLIA Training & Vendor Dine Around (Thursday, February 12th only)
$25 per person – Irrigation/Lighting and Trade Show, Product Updates and Vendeor Dine Around (Thursday, February 12 only)

Vendors in attendance includes – Hunter, Rain Bird, Toro, FX, Corona, Kichler, Spears, Blazing and more

CONTACT

Tommy Johnson
Tel: 513-383-3491
Click Here to Email

John Benson
513-772-0259
Click Here to Email

Event Schedule

Wednesday, February 11 Thursday, February 12
Where:
John Deere Landscapes
4055 Commercial Blvd.
Cincinnati, OH 45245
Where:
RSVP Event Center
453 Wards Corner Road
Loveland, OH 45140
Time: 8:00 am - 4:00 pm: CIC Training
(Box Lunch will be provided)
8:00 am - 4:00 pm: CIC & CLIA Training
(Box Lunch will be provided)
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm: Irrigation and Lighting Trade Show, Product Update
4:00 pm - 7:00pm: Dine Around