Irrigation Association Certified Irrigation Technician Training Sponsored by SiteOne and Hunter

Irrigation Association Certified Irrigation Technician Training Sponsored by SiteOne and Hunter

SiteOne Logo

 

 

 

 

 

Two Locations:

Cleveland, Ohio – February 14th, 2018

LACENTRE Conference & Banquet Facility
25777 Detroit Road
Westlake, OH 44145

Columbus, Ohio – February 15th, 2018

Crowne Plaza Columbus North
6500 Doubletree Avenue
Columbus, OH 43229

 Seats are Limited

Contact your SiteOne Representative to Register

* Includes “Landscape Irrigation System Installation and Maintenance” by the Irrigation Association

Landscape Irrigation System Installation & Maintenance

Beginner | Landscape & Golf (8 CEUs)
Learn the basics of hydraulics and irrigation system installation and maintenance. This full-day learning session covers an overview of irrigation system components and how they operate. Learn about gluing and repairing PVC pipe, installing nozzles and adjusting heads, setting and repairing electric valves, and field and controller wiring techniques. Recommended review for the certified irrigation technician exam.

Certification gives you a competitive edge. Become a certified irrigation technician and:

  • Add instant credibility with customers and employers.
  • Increase job opportunities.
  • Demonstrate your commitment to efficient water management.
  • Qualify for the EPA WaterSense program.

Certified Irrigation Technician Logo

CIT Overview

CITs are field technicians who install, maintain and repair irrigation systems. CITs

  • cut and join pipe, know the limitations of different piping systems and understand basic hydraulics.
  • lay out and install piping and water delivery components; backflow prevention components; mechanical, hydraulic and electrical irrigation controls; and other irrigation system components.
  • troubleshoot and repair irrigation components and systems.

Becoming a CIT

To become a CIT, you must:

  • Register for the exam. Recommended: six months or 1,000 hours of irrigation-related field experience.
  • Pass the irrigation technician exam. The three-hour exam includes 100 equally weighted, multiple-choice questions on basic irrigation principles, basic electrical principles and basic hydraulics.
  • Comply with the Select Certified Code of Ethics.
  • Remain in good standing. CITs must submit 20 continuing education units per two-year cycle.

CIT Exam Fees

Irrigation Technician Exam Fee — 175 (Member), $300 (Nonmember) 
Exam Retake Fee — $175 (Member), $300 (Nonmember)  
Annual Renewal Fee (one certification) — $50 (Member), $100 (Nonmember) 
Annual Renewal Fee (two or more certifications) — $100 (Member), $150 (Nonmember)

See the Certification Candidate Handbook for exam policies, procedures and fees outside of North America.

Help Wanted – Irrigation Installation Foreman, Columbus (OH) Area

Environmental Management LogoEnvironmental Management, Columbus, Ohio
Experienced Landscape Irrigation Installation Foreman Needed

Help Wanted — Irrigation Installation Foreman needed for installing and maintaining underground irrigation systems for both residential and commercial clients according to EMI standard operating procedures.

Position requires previous irrigation experience and/or electrical experience.  Foreman works in cooperation with Landscape Design/Sales, Landscape Division Operations Manager, with quality and customer satisfaction as top priority.

Communicates and resolves all issues related to installation to ensure the installation meets the specifications of the design and client.  Able to properly maintain and complete daily paperwork needed to report service activities to customers and EMI administration.  Able and willing to communicate with customer when needed.

Position may require working off hours and weekends to service residential clients.  Must be available to work extended hours, weekends and during inclement weather.

The employee must provide leadership and work direction for Irrigation Crew Laborers.  They are responsible for vehicle operation, equipment operation and adherence to EMI established safety procedures.

Salary based on experience, ranging from $17.00 to $25.00 an hour

For more information on available career opportunities, please call EMI Employee Services at 614.876.9988, or visit us at www.landscapepros.com.


About Environmental Management

Environmental Management Inc. is one of the largest landscape companies in the Columbus, Ohio, and Central Ohio areas. Environmental Management designs, builds and maintains hundreds of attractive, quality outdoor environments for both residential and commercial properties. Their experienced and hardworking professional staff provides the most comprehensive array of landscape services available in today’s marketplace – and they’re dedicated to exceeding expectations, everyday!

Winterizing a Landscape Irrigation System

(Note: This article originally appeared in SportTurf Magazine)

Winter ImageThe dreary days of November remind us that it’s time to start thinking about preparing your irrigation systems for winter. Water expands when it freezes. Since automatic irrigation systems are usually buried only about twelve inches below the surface of the soil, water left in an irrigation system in freezing climates over the winter, even a mild winter, will certainly freeze — causing damage to pipes, fittings, valves, and sprinklers. Damage caused by a frozen irrigation system can be expensive and time consuming to repair next spring. Preventing winter damage by properly winterizing the irrigation system is important. Using compressed air to force water out of the irrigation system is the most common method of winterization. However, irrigation systems equipped with automatic or manual drain valves do not require compressed air to winterize. Only the installing contractor will know if an irrigation system is equipped with automatic or manual drain valves. If you are not sure what type of irrigation system you are winterizing, then use compressed air. Using compressed air on an irrigation system equipped with automatic or manual drain valves will not harm the components of the irrigation system, and will ensure the irrigation system is properly winterized.

Selecting an Air Compressor

Sulliar 185 Portable Air Compressor

Sulliar 185 Portable Air Compressor

A properly sized air compressor is critical in effectively and efficiently blowing air into the irrigation system, forcing any water out. Air compressors are available in various sizes. The most common portable air compressor, which represents roughly 80% of the portable air compressors going into rental fleets today, is the 185 portable air compressor. This machine is rated at 185 cfm at 100 psi at full load. You can find one through a contractors’ equipment rental shop that is more than adequate to get the job done for most residential and commercial irrigation systems. Smaller 5 h.p. electric air compressors, although capable of delivering 100 psi, are not capable of delivering enough volume of air to adequately winterize an irrigation system.

Compressed Air Winterization

The first step in winterizing an irrigation system is to shut off the water to the irrigation system at the point of connection. The system shut-off valve may be a ball valve or gate valve located in the basement or directly after the water meter. Then open a zone valve to relieve the system pressure. Attach the air hose from the air compressor to the blow-out point. The blow-out point is usually located directly after the backflow device. The blow-out point may be a quick coupling valve, a hose bib, or a boiler drain. In this technical drawing the blow-out connection is the quick-coupling valve located in the valve box.

A note of caution: The expanding air coming from the air compressor into the irrigation system will get hot and may melt the plastic pipe. Carefully check the temperature of the air-hose connection at the blow-out point. Slow down or stop momentarily if it feels too hot! Cycling through each zone two or three times for short intervals will prevent too much heat buildup.

 

Winterizing an irrigation system with compressed air

Air Compressor Settings

Set the pressure regulator on the air compressor at 50 to 80 psi. On smaller residential systems, where the zones are typically about 10 gpm or less, open one electric remote control valve manually and cycle through all the other zones two to three minutes by manually opening each valve or by electrically operating each valve at the controller. Opening one valve manually will help to keep the air com- pressor from building up too much pressure while assuring an adequate volume of air to thoroughly blow out all the water in the sys- tem. On larger systems it may not be necessary to open one valve manually. Allow the air to flow through each zone until water and water vapor no longer appears from any sprinklers in the zone. Start with the zone with the highest elevation in the system or farthest from the point of connection, blowing out each zone successively toward the point of connection. It is a good idea to cycle through each zone two times to ensure there is no water remaining that might settle into a low point in the lateral pipe.

Automatic Drain System Winterization

Although using compressed air is the most common method for winterizing an automatic irrigation system, there are two other types of automatic irrigation systems. The first type is a system equipped with automatic drains. The automatic drains open when the system pressure falls below 10 psi. For these systems it is usually only necessary to turn off the water. Open a drain valve after the point of connection. Prepare the backflow device and controller for winter as noted below. Some irrigation systems incorporate automatic drain valves on the laterals and manual drain valves on the main line. The manual drain valves will be located in small valve boxes at the end and at low points on the main line. Open the drain valves, and allow the water to drain out completely. Then close the drain valve.

Manual Drain System Winterization

An irrigation system equipped with manual drain valves requires you to locate the drain valve for each zone and the main line. The manual drain is usually located in a small valve box at the end of the zone and at every low point. Also, the main line will have a manual drain at the end of the line and at every low point. Open each drain valve, allowing all the water to drain out, and then close the manual drains. Winterize the back- flow device and irrigation controller as noted below.

Backflow Winterization

Backflow Installation Detail

Typical PVB backflow installation.

There are two backflow devices utilized in landscape irrigation systems. The most common is a pressure vacuum breaker. Open the top of the pressure vacuum breaker and remove the internal discs and springs. Storing these components near the irri- gation controller makes them easier to find next spring. Turn the handles on the two ball valves and all test ports to a partially open 45 degree position. Ball valves, when fully closed or fully open, will trap water in between the ball and the valve housing. The valve housing will crack during a freeze if not left partially open.

Some newer pressure vacuum breakers are freeze resistant, with a built-in relief valve to protect the internal components and the body from freezing. It is not necessary to remove the internal components in these devices.

The other type of backflow device used in irrigation system is a reduced pressure principle backflow device, or RPZ. It is usually best to remove this device completely during the winter and store indoors. Then cap the pipes to the irrigation system. If removal of the RPZ back- flow device is not possible, carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions for winterization. Each manufacturer has specific instructions for winterizing their reduced pressure principle backflow device.

Irrigation Controller and Rain Sensor Winterization

To prepare the irrigation controller for winter, simply turn the contoller to the off or rain shutdown position. You can also disconnect the power and remove the battery but this is not necessary. It is important not to allow the controller to cycle through an irrigation schedule without water in the system because the remote-control valves require water to move through the solenoid assembly to cool the assembly.

If your irrigation system is equipped with a rain sensor or a soil moisture sensor, it is not usually necessary to cover or remove the sensor for the winter. Check with the manufacturer to make sure the sensor does not require any special instructions for win- terization.

Pump Winterization

Submersible pumps, located in a lake or stream, have a check valve at the pump which needs to be removed to make certain the discharge hose does not freeze. It is adviseable to simply remove the pump and discharge hose from water each winter, reinstalling it in the spring.

Centrifigal pumps have a drain valve located at the base of the pump housing that needs to be removed and stored for the winter. The power supply for the pump should also be disconnect- ed to prevent the pump from being accidentally turned on with- out any water. A pump running without water will quickly burn up. Additionally, if the pump is drawing water from a lake or stream, the intake hose has a foot valve located at the base of the suction line. So it is necessary to remove the intake or suction line completely from the water and store it for the winter. Sometimes a check valve is also located on the discharge side of the pump. This check valve needs to be removed and stored for the winter.

Preparing an irrigation system for winter can be a complicated process. A knowledgeable professional is essential to minimize freezing water damage. An improperly winterized irrigation system can be an expensive proposition next spring.

Help Wanted – Irrigation Installation Foreman Columbus, Ohio Area

Environmental Management LogoEnvironmental Management, Columbus, Ohio
Help Wanted – Experienced Landscape Irrigaiton Installation Foreman

Irrigation Installation Foreman needed for installing and maintaining underground irrigation systems for both residential and commercial clients according to EMI standard operating procedures.

Position requires previous irrigation experience and/or electrical experience.  Foreman works in cooperation with Landscape Design/Sales, Landscape Division Operations Manager, with quality and customer satisfaction as top priority.

Communicates and resolves all issues related to installation to ensure the installation meets the specifications of the design and client.  Able to properly maintain and complete daily paperwork needed to report service activities to customers and EMI administration.  Able and willing to communicate with customer when needed.

Position may require working off hours and weekends to service residential clients.  Must be available to work extended hours, weekends and during inclement weather.

The employee must provide leadership and work direction for Irrigation Crew Laborers.  They are responsible for vehicle operation, equipment operation and adherence to EMI established safety procedures.

Salary based on experience, ranging from $17.00 to $25.00 an hour

For more information on available career opportunities, please call EMI Employee Services at 614.876.9988, or visit us at www.landscapepros.com.


About Environmental Management

Environmental Management Inc. is one of the largest landscape companies in the Columbus, Ohio, and Central Ohio areas. Environmental Management designs, builds and maintains hundreds of attractive, quality outdoor environments for both residential and commercial properties. Their experienced and hardworking professional staff provides the most comprehensive array of landscape services available in today’s marketplace – and they’re dedicated to exceeding expectations, everyday!

Ohio CENTS Show Offers Irrigation Training Classes

Here is the schedule of irrigation training classes at the 2016 Cents Show In Columbus, Ohio January 11-13

The 2016 CENTS Show offers seven technical irrigation training classes at this year’s show. From water conservation to trouble shooting irrigation controllers, the CENTS Show has an extensive list of irrigation classes.

Below is a list of the training classes being offered

Click here for the complete schedule

Water Conservation and Cost Savings

11 Jan 2016
10:30 am – 11:30 am
C226
Scott Knowles

Scott KnowlesSaving water is a hot topic in many drought stressed parts of the nation. Lack of water is a very good reason irrigation systems must monitor and reduce water usage.

Even in the Midwest, where abundant water is more often the issue, owners of irrigation systems want to save the precious resources and money via Smart irrigation practices.

The Irrigation Association is leading the way to help consumers and green industry professionals understand water conservation. Smart Irrigation is a slogan and a category of vitally useful products and practices that can save 35-40% of the water “normal” irrigation systems and practices use.

Come learn to use Smart Irrigation practices and products as a money-making opportunity that provides your clients cost reduction and environmental benefits.

Sponsored by: The Wolf Creek Company

2016 Landscape & Irrigation Industry Trends

Capture the Growth

Tom Barrett PortraitTom Barrett will keynote the Ohio Irrigation Association’s Annual Meeting.

6:00 pm, Monday, January 11, 2016 – at the Ohio Irrigation Association’s Annual Meeting

Well known throughout the landscape industry, Tom Barrett,  has a reputation of being an innovator and accomplished corporate growth and change agent.Tom’s presentations empower people to become masters of change, rather than victims of circumstance by developing tools for transformative thinking.

Sponsored by: Hunter, Rain Bird & Toro

Irrigation Pipe Connections

12 Jan 2016 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm ONLA Garage, Hall E

How to make the common pipe connections for a landscape irrigation system.  Most consider pipe connections simple and easy, but there are some things to know to make long lasting connections that won’t fail in the future.  We’ll cover the tips to successfully make common pipe connections.

Sponsored by: Ohio Irrigation Association

Irrigation Trouble Shooting-Controller Repair

12 Jan 2016 2:30 pm – 3:00 pm ONLA Garage, Hall E

When my irrigation won’t come on where do I start looking for the problem? Is it the controller? Are the stations off, run times off or is there a mechanical problem?

Sponsored by: Century Equipment

Making Irrigation Wire Splices

13 Jan 2016 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm ONLA Garage, Hall E

Wire connections tend to be the most common electrical problem for a landscape irrigation system.  Several  easy and inexpensive wire connectors exist to help contractor make good field wire splices.  We’ll examine the most common and show how to use them.  Will also talk about the Best Practices to make a good wire connection.

Sponsored by: Ohio Irrigation Association

Irrigation Trouble Shooting-Hydraulics (Tues)

12 Jan 2016 2:00 pm – 2:30 pm ONLA Garage, Hall E

Why do some stations come on and others do not? Is there a hydraulic problem or an electrical problem? Learn the difference in open and closed valves.

Sponsored by: Century Equipment

Irrigation Wire Path Diagnostics

11 Jan 2016 3:30 pm – 4:00 pm ONLA Garage, Hall E

How to quickly determine the nature of irrigation field wire problems using a multi-meter at the controller will be demonstrated.  A time saving method to find out what issues are present on the field wiring before hunting for issues around the property.  Participants will receive a chart of possible problems and shown how to use a multi-meter to with the chart.

Sponsored by: Ohio Irrigation Association

Irrigation Trouble Shooting-Hydraulics (Mon)

11 Jan 2016 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm ONLA Garage, Hall E

Why do some stations come on and others do not? Is there a hydraulic problem or an electrical problem? Learn the difference in open and closed valves.

Sponsored by: Century Equipment